Tom Dempsey

Tom Dempsey

Tom Dempsey is a world nature travel photographer based in Seattle, Washington, USA. He is author of web site PhotoSeek.com and the book "Light Travel: Photography on the Go."

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False Chanterelle Mushrooms (Clitocybe aurantiaca) grow in Wenatchee National Forest, Washington, USA. Published in "Light Travel: Photography on the Go" book by Tom Dempsey 2009, 2010.

Staubbach Falls (Staubbachfall) is the highest waterfall in Switzerland, plunging 1000 feet (300 meters) into Lauterbrunnen Valley in the Berner Oberland, the Alps, Europe. The Bernese Highlands are the upper part of Bern Canton. UNESCO lists “Swiss Alps Jungfrau-Aletsch” as a World Heritage Area (2001, 2007). Panorama stitched from three images. Published in "Light Travel: Photography on the Go" book by Tom Dempsey 2009, 2010.

Visit Perito Moreno Glacier in Los Glaciares National Park as a day trip from El Calafate, in southwest Santa Cruz province, Argentina. Easy boardwalks give wide views of Moreno Glacier, an impressive wall of ice 200 feet high and 3 miles (5 km) wide flowing into Lake Argentina. The glacier flows up to 2300 feet thick and originates in the huge Hielo Sur (Southern Icefield) in the southern Andes mountains. For the past 90 years, its advancing has equaled melting (up to 2 meters per day, 700 meters per year), and the terminus has stayed at one location. Flowing ice periodically dams an arm of the lake which rises for a few years then breaks across the nose of the glacier as a crashing river (in March 2004 and 1991). In this 2005 photo, a narrow river flowed across the glacier face which calved large chunks of ice into the water with a loud crash several times per day. The foot of South America is known as Patagonia, a name derived from coastal giants, Patagão or Patagoni, who were reported by Magellan's 1520s voyage circumnavigating the world and were actually Tehuelche native people who averaged 25 cm (or 10 inches) taller than the Spaniards. Panorama stitched from 2 overlapping photos.

Mount Fitz Roy (3405 meters or 11,170 feet) rises abruptly above native forest in the southern Andes mountains, near El Chaltén village, in Los Glaciares National Park, Argentina, South America. In 1877, explorer Perito Moreno named "Cerro Fitz Roy" for Robert FitzRoy (no space before the capital R) who, as captain of the HMS Beagle, had travelled up the Santa Cruz River in 1834 and charted much of the Patagonian coast. First climbed in 1952 by French alpinists Lionel Terray and Guido Magnone, Mount Fitz Roy has very fickle weather and is one of the world’s most challenging technical ascents. It is also called Cerro Chaltén, Cerro Fitz Roy, and Monte Fitz Roy (with a space before the R). Chaltén comes from a Tehuelche (Aonikenk) word meaning "smoking mountain" (explained by frequent orographic clouds). Cerro is a Spanish word meaning hill. El Chaltén village was built in 1985 by Argentina to help secure the disputed border with Chile, and now tourism supports it, 220 km north of the larger town of El Calafate. The foot of South America is known as Patagonia, a name derived from coastal giants, Patagão or Patagoni, who were reported by Magellan's 1520s voyage circumnavigating the world and were actually Tehuelche native people who averaged 25 cm (or 10 inches) taller than the Spaniards. Mount Fitz Roy is the basis for the Patagonia company’s clothing logo, after Yvon Chouinard's ascent and subsequent film in 1968. Panorama stitched from 4 overlapping photos.

Mount Fitz Roy (3405 meters or 11,170 feet) rises abruptly above grass and forest in the southern Andes mountains, near El Chaltén village, in Los Glaciares National Park, Argentina, South America. In 1877, explorer Perito Moreno named "Cerro Fitz Roy" for Robert FitzRoy (no space before the capital R) who, as captain of the HMS Beagle, had travelled up the Santa Cruz River in 1834 and charted much of the Patagonian coast. First climbed in 1952 by French alpinists Lionel Terray and Guido Magnone, Mount Fitz Roy has very fickle weather and is one of the world’s most challenging technical ascents. It is also called Cerro Chaltén, Cerro Fitz Roy, and Monte Fitz Roy (with a space before the R). Chaltén comes from a Tehuelche (Aonikenk) word meaning "smoking mountain" (explained by frequent orographic clouds). Cerro is a Spanish word meaning hill. El Chaltén village was built in 1985 by Argentina to help secure the disputed border with Chile, and now tourism supports it, 220 km north of the larger town of El Calafate. The foot of South America is known as Patagonia, a name derived from coastal giants, Patagão or Patagoni, who were reported by Magellan's 1520s voyage circumnavigating the world and were actually Tehuelche native people who averaged 25 cm (or 10 inches) taller than the Spaniards. Mount Fitz Roy is the basis for the Patagonia company’s clothing logo, after Yvon Chouinard's ascent and subsequent film in 1968. Published in "Light Travel: Photography on the Go" by Tom Dempsey 2009, 2010.

Sunrise on Cerro Fitz Roy (3405 meters / 11,170 feet), Glaciers National Park, Argentina. Panorama stitched from 3 images. Published in "Light Travel: Photography on the Go" book by Tom Dempsey 2009, 2010.

The Bloedel Reserve was near its peak of fall colors on October 19, 2005. The Bloedel Reserve is a 150-acre forest garden on Bainbridge Island, Washington, made by the vice-chairman of a lumber company, under the influence of the conservation movement and oriental philosophy. The Bloedel Reserve has both natural and highly-landscaped lakes, immaculate lawns, woods, a traditional Japanese garden, a rock and sand Zen garden, a moss garden, a rhododendron glade, and a Reflection Garden. The Bloedel's French Chateau-style home is preserved as a Visitor Center, including many original furnishings. Reservations are required. Published in "Light Travel: Photography on the Go" by Tom Dempsey 2009, 2010.

Water droplets form balls on a leaf of skunk cabbage (Lysichitum americanum, in the Calla Lily Family, Araceae), on the hike to Lake 22, in Mount Baker-Snoqualmie National Forest, Washington, USA. Published in "Light Travel: Photography on the Go" by Tom Dempsey 2009, 2010.

A white Avalanche Lily (Erythronium) grows next to a yellow Glacier Lily on Tolmie Peak, Mount Rainier National Park, Washington, USA. Published in "Light Travel: Photography on the Go" by Tom Dempsey 2009, 2010.

Fireweed blooms pink magenta at Summit Lake (3210 feet elevation) beneath the snowy Alaska Range, along the Richardson Highway near Paxson, in Alaska, USA.

Mount McKinley / Denali rises to 20,320 feet elevation (6194 m) along Denali National Park Road near Eielson Visitor Center, Alaska, USA. Denali is the highest mountain peak in North America, and measured from base to peak, it is earth's tallest mountain on land. Denali is only visible 1 out of 3 days. Rain falls as light showers or drizzle for half of summer days. The earliest shuttle bus doesn’t reach Denali views until mid morning. The least cloudy time is early morning, which suggests overnight tenting at Wonder Lake to best see the mountain. Mount McKinley is a granitic pluton uplifted by tectonic pressure while erosion has simultaneously stripped away the somewhat softer sedimentary rock above and around it. The native Athabaskan name "Denali" is correct according to most Alaskans and the Alaska Board of Geographic Names, while "Mount McKinley" is correct according to the United States Board on Geographic Names. Alaska’s attempts to change the name to Denali at the national level have been regularly blocked by Ohio congressmen protecting the honor of former president William McKinley who was born in Ohio. Published in "Light Travel: Photography on the Go" by Tom Dempsey 2009, 2010.